SAMOS – saltwater intrusion monitoring system

#salt water intrusion #monitoring #vertical electrode chain #geoelectrics #geochain
Explanatory graphic for the installed SAMOS electrode chain at Spiekeroog for monitoring the fresh-saltwater boundary
Monitoring of the fresh-saltwater boundary at Spiekeroog © Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG)

The SAMOS saltwater monitoring system was developed to continuously monitor the quality of the water underground. This enables the early detection of and warnings about increasing salinity.

Climate change and demographic development have unseen secondary effects on groundwater. There is a risk of groundwater salinization, especially on coasts and islands.

The saltwater monitoring system (SAMOS) was developed at the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG) to monitor the quality of the water underground. This monitoring is not restricted to a single point; rather, it takes place over a length of 25 metres. The specific resistance is measured several times a day. This allows LIAG to give an early warning if rising saltwater endangers the wells of water works. The real-time evaluations can be viewed and used by the water utility at any time. In this way, they provide crucial information for sustainable water management. With an integrated solar panel, the monitoring system supplies itself with energy and can collect data for the long term.

SAMOS is based on direct current geoelectrics and consists of a vertical electrode chain that is permanently installed in a borehole. An electric current is fed into the earth via the automatic measuring system on the earth's surface and the potential field is measured. The electrical resistance determined from this is an indicator of the salinity of the groundwater.

SAMOS has already been installed at three locations on the coast of Lower Saxony. The system is the only one of its kind in the world.

Water resource: Groundwater, Salt water
Type of product:
  • Management concepts & assessments
TRL: 7
    TRL (Technology Readiness Level)
  • TRL 1 - Basic principles observed
  • TRL 2 - Technology concept formulated
  • TRL 3 - Experimental proof of concept
  • TRL 4 - Technology validated in lab
  • TRL 5 - Technology validated in relevant environment (industrially relevant environment in the case of key enabling technologies)
  • TRL 6 - Technology demonstrated in relevant environment (industrially relevant environment in the case of key enabling technologies)
  • TRL 7 - System prototype demonstration in operational environment
  • TRL 8 - System complete and qualified
  • TRL 9 - Actual system proven in operational environment (competitive manufacturing in the case of key enabling technologies; or in space)
Application sector: Water resource management
Funding measure: GRoW
Project: go-CAM

Contact and partners


  • Leibniz-Institut für Angewandte Geophysik (LIAG),
  • Stilleweg 2,
  • 30655 Hannover
https://www.leibniz-liag.de

Oldenburgisch-Ostfriesischer Wasserverband
Leibniz-Institut für Angewandte Geophysik (LIAG),
Hannover

This site uses third-party website tracking technologies to provide its services. I agree to this and can revoke or change my consent at any time with effect for the future.